Nick Shottel’s Guide To Lockdown Downtime

Our resident entertainment guru, Nick Shottel, is back to ensure we’re enjoying downtime during lockdown.

From TV and music, to books and playlists, he’s got us covered this June. Here’s what he’s got in store this time…

 

 

READ

The Boy on the Shed by Paul Ferris

I’m really looking forward to starting my new book, delivered this morning by Amazon. It is called ‘The Boy on the Shed’ and is a memoir written by Paul Ferris, former player and physio at Newcastle United.

Paul Ferris was a teenage prodigy, becoming Newcastle United’s youngest-ever player in 1982, only for injury to ensure his promise went unfulfilled. He later returned to the club as a physiotherapist before earning a master’s degree and beginning a successful quest to qualify as a barrister. But the lure of football was always strong and he went back for a third spell at Newcastle, as Head of the Medical Department – again working closely with a host of big-name players and managers. The memoir tells of his life and family, growing up in Northern Ireland during the troubles and how a twist of fate brought him to Newcastle.

 

WATCH

Ozark

I’m really enjoying ‘Ozark’ on Netflix at the moment. I had started watching it some time ago but, for one reason or another, stopped after about four episodes. I’ve started watching it again and I’m totally hooked. The story follows Marty Byrde, a financial planner who relocates his family from Chicago to a summer resort community in the Ozark Mountains, Missouri. With wife Wendy and their two kids in tow, Marty is on the move after a money-laundering scheme goes wrong, forcing him to pay off a substantial debt to a Mexican drug lord in order to keep his family safe. While the Byrdes’ fate hangs in the balance, the dire circumstances force the fractured family to reconnect.

 

LISTEN

The Craig David Funk and Soul Show

My go-to listen on a Sunday morning is ‘The Craig David Funk and Soul Show’ on BBC Sounds. It is broadcast on Saturday evenings, but I always catch up with it on a Sunday morning whilst pottering around the house. It’s a great mix of classic and modern funk and soul. It’s a great listen.

Nick’s Playlist

This time I’ve gone a little more up-tempo and have produced a playlist consisting of 20 dance tracks. Hope you enjoy it. Check it out here: open.spotify.com/playlist.

A Day in the Life of… Richard Celardi, Manager at Café 21, Saltwater & Porterhouse

How I’m staying safe and keeping motivated at home during lockdown…

 

A Day in the Life of... Richard Celardi, Manager at Café 21, Saltwater & Porterhouse

 

I GET UP ON A MORNING FOR… Lunch!

 

BREAKFAST IS… Usually an episode of Friends or a Smiths album, maybe a cup of tea or a bit of fruit. I’m never up earlier than half 9, so it makes sense to wait for lunch.

 

TO STAY ACTIVE, I… Have been running most nights. I am trying to build up to running 50 miles a week before we go back. It’s even harder than I thought it would be… I might have to settle for 40!

 

TO UNWIND, I… Listen to music, but it’s not like I need to unwind. This is like uni but without the hangovers, less reading and more fresh air!

 

I’M WATCHING… All sorts. The Deuce, Modern Family, Cocaine Coast, White Lines and a couple of Euro 96 matches. The Pianist (Netflix) is also a great film – a lockdown must.

 

I’M READING… Eric Clapton – The Autobiography and El Diego – the Diego Maradona biography. 

 

I’M LISTENING TO… Loads of The Smiths and The Beatles. Others include: Stereophonics, The Stone Roses, The Rolling Stones, The Courteneers, Oasis and The Libertines.

 

SOMEWHERE I’D RATHER BE… Anywhere where you can go out and the bars are open, but if I’m really dreaming, it would have to be Vegas on a fight night or Rio for the World Cup Final.

 

THREE TOP TIPS FOR STAYING AT HOME…

Stay positive
Get as much fresh air as possible – tomorrow I’m going for fish and chips in Tynemouth with my little bro we are going to walk there and back.
Enjoy the sun when you can 

 

DURING LOCKDOWN, I HAVE LEARNT… That England would have beat Germany in 1996 if Terry Venables had made better decisions.

 

QUOTE OF THE DAY… I suppose Rousseau springs to mind… “Man is born free, but he is everywhere in chains.”

Try This: A Quick Sunshine Lunch

The perfect sunshine lunch is sometimes the simplest of dishes.

Pick up whatever fruit and veg you have in the fridge – along with anything you can pick from the garden – toss it together in a bowl with a bit of salt and olive oil, and you’ve got a deliciously fresh salad.

Give it a go…

 

Try This: A Little Something For A Quick Sunshine Lunch

 

A LITTLE SOMETHING FOR A QUICK SUNSHINE LUNCH

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 large ripe tomato, cut into chunks
¼ cucumber, peeled and sliced
1 ripe but firm peach, cut into wedges
8 torn basil leaves,
10 torn mint leaves
1 tbsp whole, blanched almonds
½ tbsp best quality balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp best quality extra virgin olive oil
Maldon sea salt

METHOD:

  • Toss the tomatoes and cucumbers in a bowl with a pinch of salt and the olive oil.
  • Add the peaches and herbs.
  • Divide between two salad plates, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and scatter the almonds.
  • I often add some torn buffalo mozzarella or sometimes a plate of parma ham for a more substantial lunch

Follow this recipe and share with us on social media using the hashtag, #21AtHome. 

The Challenge: Cocktails at Home

We’ve all been adapting to ‘the new normal’ – whether that’s with a new working from home routine, fitness in the garden, heading up the home kitchen, or indeed mixing up something exciting from the drinks cabinet. 

This week, I challenged Ben, our Bar Manager at St Vincent, to see what he could do with this mixed bag. An accumulation of holiday tipples picked up over an untold number of years!

Let’s see what he’s come up with.

Over to you, Ben…

 

 

White Lady

This is an absolute classic, refined at The American Bar at The Savoy in the 1920s and 30s. It’s still just as popular in the ‘World’s Best Bar’ today.

INGREDIENTS:

1 part Cointreau (20ml recommended)
2 parts gin
Juice of 1 lemon
1 tsp sugar (or ½ part syrup)
Egg white (optional)

METHOD:

To make it you need to mix or shake these ingredients quickly, preferably with ice. You could do this in a cocktail shaker, but if you don’t have one use a blender, protein shaker or a Tupperware box with a lid.

Add all of the ingredients and shake for around 30 seconds or blend for around 10 seconds. Then strain or sieve the drink into a glass to remove any shards of ice left from the shaking or blending. Drink straight up, without any ice the glass.

You can use any sugar you have in (white, granulated works best) or make a quick simple syrup (1 part sugar to 1 part water in a saucepan over a medium heat and stir until all the sugar has dissolved). You also have the option to add the white of 1 egg to the recipe. This won’t alter the flavour, but will give the drink a lovely, silky texture.

 

Cherry Twisted Negroni

A beautiful drink to sip in the late afternoon sun and really straightforward to make.

INGREDIENTS:

1 part Amaro Montenegro (20ml recommended)
1 part Schlanderer Kirschwasser (cherry brandy)
1.5 parts gin

METHOD:

Simply add all of the ingredients to a short glass with lots of ice. Give it a quick stir for 15 to 20 seconds and it’s ready. This is fantastic with a nice, chunky wedge of orange as a garnish. If you find it too strong, just give it another stir to dilute the drink some more.

 

Armagnac Sidecar (3 Ways)

A sidecar is classically made using Cognac and is a great drink for later in the evening. Here, we’re going to use Armagnac instead of Cognac – and I’ve given a few variations for something a bit different. Some people like to serve a Sidecar with a sugar rim on the glass – it’s completely your preference – the drink is delicious either way.

INGREDIENTS:

1 part Cointreau, Schlanderer Williams Birne (pear brandy) or Aprikosengeist (apricot brandy) (20ml recommended)
1.5 parts Armagnac
Juice of half a lemon

METHOD:

To make a more traditional Sidecar recipe, add the Armagnac, Cointreau and lemon juice to a cocktail shaker, protein shaker or Tupperware box with a good amount of ice. Shake it vigorously for around 30 seconds until the drink is nicely chilled and diluted. Then, if you like, you can rim your glass with sugar (a glass with a stem is great, but a shorter glass or even a wine glass will work well). To do this, tip a small amount of sugar on to a plate. Then slowly rub the rim of the glass in the sugar until you have a nice coating of sugar all the way around the rim. If you’re struggling to get the sugar to stick then you can rub a lemon wedge around the rim of the glass before dipping it in the sugar.

Now, strain or sieve the drink into your glass without ice and enjoy. If you like you can garnish with a twist of lemon or orange. Take a long, narrow strip of peel and carefully twist it around the handle of a spoon and then drop it into the drink.

Alternatively, Armagnac works very well with both pear and apricot so, if you want something a bit different, replace the Cointreau with the Schlanderer Williams Birne or Aprikosengeist. You may need to use a little less than you would when making the drink with Cointreau and you could add a touch of sugar if you wish.

 

Share your own lockdown cocktail creations on social media using the hashtag, #21LockdownChallenge.

A Day in the Life of… St Vincent Manager, Matt Clarkson

How I’m staying safe and keeping motivated at home during lockdown…

 

 

I GET UP ON A MORNING FOR… The kids, usually much earlier than I would ideally like. Then coffee…

 

BREAKFAST IS… When Nina’s going to work, usually a smoothie with any fruit that might be just past its best. Freezing peeled bananas then popping one of them whole into the blender works a treat. If Nina’s off, for a treat I knock up baked eggs with spiced tomato sauce and loads of toast to dip in, the kids love it.

 

TO STAY ACTIVE, I… Try to go for a walk every couple of days. One of the kids is usually strapped to me and the other in the pushchair as we try to hit a few big hills. I also do 100 press-ups twice a week just to keep the muscles interested.

 

TO UNWIND, I… Try to pick up the guitar if I get the chance. We’ve also just got this acupuncture mat with thousands of needle-sharp spikes on it resembling a bed of nails. The ancients believed it assisted in increased levels of relaxation and meditation… it’s great for back pain, too. I try to have a session on it a couple of times a week. It’s pretty painful, but I have fallen asleep on it a few times

 

I’M WATCHING… Gangs of London… it’s brutal and so addictive. Watch it!

 

I’M READING… A book called Cosa Nostra, which is a sinister insight into the revered Sicilian Mafia.

 

I’M LISTENING TO… A lot of upbeat rock at the moment. After tea every night, me and the girls have 20 minutes with it blasting to burn off any remaining energy before bed. Other tunes like: Just A Day by Feeder, Girl From Mars by Ash, The Passenger by Iggy Pop and a guilty pleasure… Paradise By The Dashboard Light by Meatloaf.

 

SOMEWHERE I’D RATHER BE… Currently, nowhere! Life moves too fast. We should be able to appreciate this downtime and keep everyone safe. I’m sure I’ll never have another opportunity to spend everyday at home with the kids.

 

THREE TOP TIPS FOR STAYING AT HOME…

Plan your meals – It’s not easy cooking all of the time, so if you can plan ahead and make a bit extra and freeze some, it takes the pressure off later in the week.

Keep busy – It’s a real opportunity to get on top of all of those little jobs around the house and garden that you normally just don’t have time for. I usually tick things off my list and somehow my list keeps getting bigger and bigger!

Stay in touch – Obviously we can’t meet each other in person, but using things like WhatsApp and Zoom are becoming the new norm. We’ve had a couple of St. V get togethers, a pub quiz and far too many drinks one night.

I know this is number four, but allowing for some alone time is vital. No phone, no TV, no kids etc… just time to think, relax and appreciate everything you have. I also find myself thinking of everywhere I want to go for my next holiday and where I next want to eat… whenever that may be.

 

DURING LOCKDOWN, I HAVE LEARNT… To appreciate what I have and also that parenting two kids under 4-years-old, three days a week, is no walk in the park!

 

QUOTE OF THE DAY… “#stayhome.”

Try This: Dan Warren’s Lockdown Chicken

Dan Warren, Head Chef at The Broad Chare, shares a simple ‘one-pot’ dish that really delivers when it comes to spring flavours. 

 

This chicken recipe is quick and easy to make, with no compromise on flavour. It’s made up of pretty straight-forward ingredients and is the ideal one-pot dish to see you through a day or two in lockdown.

The bird is cooked sealed tight with potatoes, aromatics, stock and butter, resulting in juicy flesh, tender vegetables and a rich fragrant liquor.

 

 

LOCKDOWN CHICKEN

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 free-range chicken (around 1.5kg)
400g waxy salad potatoes, peeled and halved
2 celery sticks, washed & roughly chopped
1 small leek, washed & roughly chopped
6 cloves garlic
3 bay leaves (fresh or dried)
Sprig of thyme and lovage (optional)
1 unwaxed lemon
50ml EV olive oil
100g unsalted butter, softened
200ml chicken stock or water
Salt and pepper
300g peas (fresh or frozen)

 

METHOD:

  • Preheat the oven to 220°C / gas mark 7.
  • Remove the wishbone from the chicken to ensure easier carving when cooked, then season liberally inside and out.
  • Place the potatoes, celery, leeks, garlic, pared lemon zest and herbs in an ovenproof (ideally cast iron) dish, then set the chicken on top.
  • Spread the butter generously on to the bird, pour over the stock and olive oil and season again. Place a square of greaseproof paper on the chicken, then foil the dish to create a tight seal, to prevent any moisture from escaping.
  • Cook for 45 minutes, then reduce the temperature to 150°C / gas mark 2. Cook for a further 45 minutes or until the juices run clear.
  • Remove chicken from the dish and add the peas for a further 30 minutes, while the bird rests. The peas will lose their verdant colour but will swell and become tender and sweet, absorbing the rich chicken juices.
  • To finish, joint the chicken and colour skin-side in a little foaming butter if desired. Adjust the cooking liquor to taste with a little lemon juice and seasoning.
  • Serve the chicken with the braised vegetables and their juices. Enjoy with aioli and some good bread.

 

Fancy giving Dan Warren’s Lockdown Chicken a go? Follow this recipe and post on social media using the hashtag, #21AtHome. 

Cheddar Cheese & Spinach Soufflé

An all-time 21 favourite

Our Cheddar Cheese & Spinach Soufflé is the perfect lockdown treat! We’ve been cooking and serving this dish for 30 years – and in that time, I’m sure that one or two of you have become addicted. Here’s a way to get your fix at home…

INGREDIENTS

180ml milk
1 bay leaf
100g grated parmesan cheese
1/4 small onion
1 clove
30g softened butter, plus a little extra for preparing the moulds
30g plain flour
100g grated mature cheddar cheese
3 egg yolks
3 egg whites
1 tsp English mustard
60g chopped sautéed spinach
Pinch of salt
300ml double cream

METHOD

  1. Prepare 4 x oven proof ramekins by brushing with softened butter and dusting with a little of the grated parmesan cheese. Refrigerate.
  2. Bring milk to a boil together with the onion, bay leaf and clove. Remove from the heat, cover and set aside to infuse.
  3. Make a roux by melting 30g butter over a gentle heat and then add the flour, stir gently for 5 minutes over a low heat.
  4. Allow the roux to cool a little before adding the infused milk, a little at a time, stirring till smooth between each addition. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Remove from the heat and stir in the grated cheddar cheese, followed by the English mustard, egg yolks and spinach.
  6. Cover with a buttered paper and keep warm.
  7. Whisk the egg whites with a tiny pinch of salt until quite firm.
  8. Beat 1/3 of the whipped egg whites into the cheese sauce using a whisk.
  9. Fold in the remainder very carefully with a rubber spatula.
  10. Divide the mixture between the pre-prepared ramekins.
  11. Sit in an oven proof tray and add boiling water to come halfway up the ramekins.
  12. Transfer to the oven at 135 degrees C for 28 mins.
  13. Remove from the oven, increase the oven temp to 200 degrees C.
  14. Turn the soufflés out into individual oven proof dishes.
  15. Pour over a generous amount of double cream followed by a good dusting of grated Parmesan cheese.
  16. Return to the oven until well risen and golden (around 12 – 15 mins).
  17. Serve immediately.

Try This: Alpen Macaroni

Kitchen management is a challenge at the best of times. Throw in a global pandemic, a nationwide lockdown and several shopping restrictions, and we’ve got a task on our hands. 

But, with a bit of time, some creativity – and with the ability to digitally share our recipes and ideas – we’ll be able to share some easy-to-follow recipes in each newsletter bulletin. First up, it’s my Alpen Macaroni… 

In the mid 70s I spent a couple of years working in Switzerland, mainly in the Engadine Mountains around St Moritz and Davos. This pasta dish was always a big hit at the staff table. Hot, cheesy and comforting – it’s quick, simple and cheap to make; perfect lockdown food!

The apple sauce is a bit of an oddity – a peculiarly Swiss thing, but it really helps cut through the richness of the pasta gratin. Try it with a leaf salad and a fairly sharp, mustard dressing.

 

 

ALPEN MACARONI

INGREDIENTS:

225g Maris Piper (or other maincrop potatoes, peeled and cut into 1.5cm cubes)
125g macaroni or penne
15g butter
1 finely diced onion
70g streaky bacon, cut into chunks
2tbls white wine
140ml chicken stock
240ml whipping cream
Salt and pepper, to season
½tbsl chopped parsley
25g grated Gruyere cheese

METHOD:

  • Bring a pan of salted water to the boil and add the potatoes. Simmer for 3 or 4 minutes before throwing in the pasta.
  • Continue cooking until the potatoes are tender and the pasta al dente. Drain in a colander.
  • Melt the butter in a wide pan and sweat the onions and bacon until the onions are soft.
  • Add the wine, scraping the base of the pan to release any tasty residue.
  • Simmer and reduce the wine by half, then add the stock and cream.
  • Add the pasta/potato mix and simmer on a low heat until the liquids are absorbed and the mixture is thick and unctuous.
  • Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper before stirring in the chopped parsley.
  • Transfer to an ovenproof dish, scatter the grated cheese over the top and glaze under the grill or in a hot oven.
  • Serve with apple sauce on the side, and a green salad.

 

APPLE SAUCE

INGREDIENTS:

300g Bramley apples
½ cinnamon stick
1 clove
1 pinch grated nutmeg
¼ lemon (juice)
½tsp caster sugar
2tbsl water
1½tsp butter

METHOD:

  • Peel, core and dice the apples.
  • Put into a stainless steel pan with the sugar, lemon juice, water, butter and spices.
  • Cover and cook gently for 15-20 minutes, or until the apples collapse.
  • Remove the cinnamon stick and clove, then puree the apples with a hand blender.
  • Cool and serve.
  • This will make more than you need, but it freezes well. You can use a store-bought alternative if you wish. You won’t get the sack!

Store-Cupboard Staple: Bay Leaves

I bet you’ve all had a look in the kitchen cupboard and thought, ‘what the hell am I going to do with this?’, more so than ever in recent weeks! 

The truth is, we’re all in this strange scenario together, and if we’re going to put a positive spin on it, let’s think of cooking as a challenge – a chance to unleash our creative side.  

With that in mind, I’m going to be setting fortnightly tasks for some of our team. My first ‘store-cupboard challenge’ goes to our Café 21 Head Chef, Kev Pratt. 

We’ve all been tasked with tackling those forgotten-about store-cupboard products. You’ve probably all got a jar of out-of-date bay leaves in the cupboard somewhere. How can we put them to good use in the kitchen?  

Let’s see what Kev can do with those bay leaves. 

Over to you, Kev…

 

 

BAY LEAVES

Often used either on their own or as part of a classic bouquet garni, bay leaves are at the foundation of flavoursome cooking. Think of bay as more of a spice than a herb; at its best when used with other ingredients to enhance herbal warmth or depth of spice.

Originally from the Mediterranean, bay leaves are one of the few herbs to grow as a tree, which makes them very different in the way they are enjoyed in food.

Use them to flavour and enhance your cooking. They release fragrance and flavour best when cooked slowly, so that is why you’ll often find them in soups and stews, but they also work well in desserts, such as rice pudding and crème brûlée.

Bay has been used medicinally since the middle ages, and contains vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, and magnesium. Try dropping two leaves into boiling water with a pinch of sugar and cinnamon for a restorative drink.

 

3 WAYS TO COOK WITH BAY AT HOME

 

SCOTCH BROTH

[serves 4]

  • Gently fry 2 chopped onions in a little oil.
  • Add 250g each of chopped carrots, turnips (or swede) and 2 chopped celery stalks. Season well and sweat for a few minutes.
  • Add a handful of pearl barley and a handful of soaked split peas, then top up with stock and 2 bay leaves. Bring to a boil, then simmer for an hour.

 

‘COQ AU VIN’

[serves 4]

  • Sweat 2 chopped shallots in a buttered casserole dish, then stir in 3 crushed garlic cloves, 50g chopped streaky bacon, dried thyme and 2 bay leaves.
  • Cook for a minute, then add 100g button mushrooms and 8 chicken thighs. Cook further to brown the chicken.
  • Add two teaspoons of flour and stir to incorporate, then add 600ml chicken stock and a glass of red wine.
  • Bring to a boil then simmer very gently for 30 minutes, until the chicken is cooked.

 

BAY-INFUSED RICE PUDDING

[serves 4]

  • Add 1 bay leaf to 500ml milk, 100g pudding rice, 60g sugar and 1 vanilla pod, and simmer very gently until the rice is soft.
  • Soak 1 gelatine leaf in cold water for 5 minutes, squeeze out then add to the rice.
  • Remove the bay. Whisk 130ml double cream into peaks and mix in 65ml natural yoghurt. Add to the rice with 30g raisins.
  • Pour into 4 moulds and chill for an hour.

 

Share what you do with your bay leaves on social media using the hashtag, #21LockdownChallenge. 

A Day in the Life of… 21 Boss, Terry Laybourne

How I’m staying safe and keeping motivated at home during lockdown…

 

 

I GET UP ON A MORNING FOR… Right now it’s bizarre. Things are way too leisurely for me.

 

BREAKFAST IS… Bircher muesli and a slice of sourdough toast, with probably too much butter, Dan’s marmalade, and black coffee. I’m partial to the odd bowl of Coco Pops, too!

 

TO STAY ACTIVE, I… Try my best to exercise for an hour each day, either on my bike or walking in the countryside around us with Susan and our Airedale Terrier, Ernie.

 

TO UNWIND, I… Cook every day at the moment – which, for me, is a joy. I’m loving the challenge of cooking from the hip, using stuff up; opening the fridge or cupboard and trying to figure out what best to do with what I’ve got in front of me.

 

I’M WATCHING… Just finished binge-watching a Swedish cop thriller called Before You Die on All 4. It was captivating and dark… I really like this type of Scandi crime drama. I’ve also been enjoying our pal Roger Crosby knocking out some great tunes on Facebook. Check it out here.  

 

I’M READING… The Apprentice by Jacques Pepin (on audio). It’s a great, uplifting story that charts the career of a great chef. A must-read for anyone in our business. I’ve also got a Michael Connolly novel on the go, as I daren’t read anything remotely work-related before bed, otherwise I’ll never sleep. 

 

I’M LISTENING TO… A mixed bag really. Over the last few days I’ve been listening to The Fun Lovin Criminals Mimosa, Imelda May’s Life Love Flesh Blood, Robert Palmer’s Sneekin’ Sally Through the Alley, A Paul Weller Live album and a load of old soul compilations. All seriously good ‘kitchen music’!

 

SOMEWHERE I’D RATHER BE… Back to work and on the tools, I really miss it.

 

THREE TOP TIPS FOR STAYING AT HOME… Create a varied routine and try to stick to it. Stay active. Challenge yourself by learning something new – I’ve put a teach yourself French app on my phone… honestly, I’ve been learning the French language on and off for the last fifty years! If you fancy giving it a go and beating me to it, the download link is here.

 

DURING LOCKDOWN, I HAVE LEARNT… That time can run away with you, unless you make a conscious effort to get stuff done! If you’re not careful you can get up and go back to bed without achieving anything at all, which can be seriously demoralising.

 

QUOTE OF THE DAY… “If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”